Formadrain is Your Perfect No-Dig Solution for Repairing Underground Pipes

Hundreds of miles have been successfully lined with this system since 1994!

Here's Some Key Benefits of the Formadrain No-Dig System for You...

Formadrain is a true no-dig technology. It is a steam-cured, fiberglass and epoxy system that is pulled-in-place through existing pipes. This means it is used to repair underground pipes without digging. With no excavation, it can perform lateral repairs, Lateral-Main-Connection® repairs, spot repairs and process piping repairs.

In addition, the Formadrain system:

  • Has been steam cured since 1994 when it was developed.
  • Has lined hundreds of miles of pipe since its launch.
  • Counts over 40 authorized Formadrain licensees across the United States and Canada.
  • Can repair circular pipes from 2 to 48 inches (50 to 1200 mm) in diameter.
  • Contains Green technology: No Volatile Organic Compounds used (VOC Free)

Read more of the Formadrain advantages here.


Laval celebrates completion of work on three drinking water plants

LAVAL, QUEBEC–(Marketwired – Dec. 19, 2016) – The citizens of Laval and surrounding areas can now enjoy quality drinking water thanks to a major investment by the governments of Canada and Quebec to upgrade the Chomedey, Pont-Viau and Sainte-Rose water treatment plants in Laval. This project will help improve residents’ quality of life, upgrade community infrastructure and promote sustainable development and prosperity for the community.

The announcement was made today by Eva Nassif, Member of Parliament for Vimy, Yves Robillard, Member of Parliament for Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, and Angelo Iacono, Member of Parliament for Alfred-Pellan, on behalf of the Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, and Francine Charbonneau, Minister responsible for Seniors and Anti-Bullying, Minister responsible for the Laval region, and Member of the National Assembly for Mille-Îles, who was accompanied by the three Members of the National Assembly for Laval, Jean Habel, Guy Ouellette and Saul Polo, on behalf of the Martin Coiteux, Minister of Municipal Affairs and Land Occupancy, Minister of Public Security and Minister responsible for the Montréal region. Mr. Marc Demers, Mayor of Laval, was also in attendance.

Source: Laval celebrates completion of work on three drinking water plants DIGITAL JOURNAL

U.S. could copy Canada’s infrastructure model: Caisse

Incoming U.S. President Donald Trump could set up an entity similar to Canada’s infrastructure bank to help fund his plans to spend $1 trillion on roads and bridges, one of the world’s biggest infrastructure investors said. Michael Sabia, chief executive officer of the Caisse [CDPDA.UL], Canada’s second-biggest public pension fund, was on the advisory panel[Read More…]

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Water and storm infrastructure upgrades to help safeguard public health and safety

DEER LAKE, NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR, DECEMBER 2, 2016 — The governments of Canada and Newfoundland and Labrador are making infrastructure investments that will help create jobs, grow the middle class, and support a high standard of living for Canadians and their families for years to come. The Honourable Dwight Ball, Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador,[Read More…]

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Trudeau touts Canada as safe option for infrastructure investment

Justin Trudeau is billing Canada as a stable option for international investors amid market uncertainty in the aftermath of the election of Donald Trump in the United States. Speaking at the end of a day spent courting some of the world’s largest wealth managers, the Prime Minister added a clear political spin to his government’s[Read More…]

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Ottawa to make ‘unprecedented’ appeal for private investment in infrastructure

Ottawa is hoping to leverage at least $35-billion through a new Canada Infrastructure Bank that would package government money with private funds to build more projects more quickly. Source: Ottawa to make ‘unprecedented’ appeal for private investment in infrastructure – The Globe and Mail

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